Bringing it all back home?

The concept of a PIE has reached its furthest development so far in the context of homelessness and related services, working with people with the most complex needs, and especially with long histories of trauma and exclusion. These are the 'psychological' issues for which the PIE approach was most eagerly adopted and it is certainly arguable this was where such thinking was most needed, as Johnson suggests in "is a PIE just about homelessness?"

Three items here show how the idea is now penetrating into therapeutic settings - which is where in fact it has its roots. John Conolly's chapter - from the Cross-cultural dialogues ( for more on the book, see: HERE); Leonie Boland's presentation at the 2018 Homelessness Health conference, and San Clark's description of introducing reflective practice in psychiatric wards, in the "Towards a PIE city" conference. 

But this thinking has deeper origins; and two further items included here indicate this depth of history  - Rex Haigh et al describing the development of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' 'enabling environments' initiative; and Robin Johnson - also one of the developer team for 'enabling environments' - takes the idea still further back in his Masters dissertation of 1981, with descriptions of many of the areas where the post-War concept of a 'therapeutic community' has since been able to go..

 

Further material

  • Introducing the PIE approach
  • Built environment and adaptations
  • Using the whole environment:
  • PIEs, outreach and community
  • PIEs in 'single site' Housing First
  • PIEs in clinical work
  • 'Psychologically informed business environments'
  • Whole systems change
  • PIE Techniques
  • PIEs and ‘exclusion- informed research’

 

The suggestion that it was homelessness services in the UK, now working with some of the people with the most complex needs, that most needed the PIE framework to describe and guide their work, was made in   Is a PIE just about homelessness? by Robin Johnson.  But, as he argues, there is nothing unique to homelessness about the basic ideas.

In Pre-treatment therapy by John Conolly - an excerpt from "Cross-cultural dialogues in homelessness ( details : HERE) - he describes applications of PIEs and pretreatment in therapy settings (Coming Soon)

Reflexive photography – Leonie Boland - OT in re-homing; NB: Bolan's use of 'selfie' photography as a platform for eliciting recently re-settled people's experience and the meaning of their new homes is also an example of exclusion-informed research. (Coming Soon)

Towards a PIE city – Sian Clark  - PIEs in acute wards in Bristol; reflective practice ; applications in therapy settings  HERE

 

Also related

For the broader origins of the PIEs approach, see "Psychologically Informed environments and the Enabling environments initiative" by Rex  Haigh et al.

NB: For those wishing to have an external assessment of their service, the Enabling Environments process, leading to the Enabling Environment award, remains closet in spirit to the PIEs approach.

In search of the enabling environment - Robin Johnson - HERE

Pre-treatment therapy –  John Conolly - applications of PIEs and pretreatment in therapy settings (1)(Coming Soon)

Reflexive photography – Leonie Boland - OT in re-homing; exclusion-informed research.(Coming Soon)

Towards a PIE city – Sian Clark  - PIEs in acute wards in Bristol; reflective practuce ; applications in therapy settings  HERE

 

Also related

Psychologically Informed environments and the Enabling environments initiative - Haigh et al - HERE

In search of the enabling environment - Robin Johnson - HERE