Challenges

The concept of a psychologically informed environment, and the adoption of a "psychological model", comes with a clear recognition that any real embedding of ideas in a service only comes when staff and service users are able to question how the service runs, and make changes.

This extends to questioning what being a PIE really means; and even how suitable it really is, as a model.  For example, for some gently challenging thoughts, in cartoon form, on the role of psychology in the development of PIEs, see the video - "Does it take a psychologist to make a PIE?"

One persistent question is whether there is any significant difference between the (primarily UK) concept of a PIE, and the (primarily US) concept of 'Trauma Informed Care".  In a webinar, Jo Prestidge and Claire Ritchie explore the rival claim of each, and their many areas of overlap.

In an early draft of an extended paper, 'Principles and practice in the psychology of homelessness" as yet un-published, Robin Johnson explores these areas, and also the links with Housing First, Pretreatment, and broader 'system change' approaches. 

There is also a longer discussion of these issues, in an article from the Members' Library:   The meanings of 'psychology'

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Similarly, there were many discussions in the Housing Care and Support journal special issue on PIEs. Subject experts from a variety of fields were invited to write a commentary, brief or extended, on the concept of a PIE, and the 'operational guidance' - 'Psychologically Informed Services' (Keats et al, 2012) - that had then just been issued. These authors were encouraged to be as critical or wary as they felt appropriate. 

NB: for copyright protection reasons, other than the editorial, these papers are now only available in the Members' Library.

Housing Care and Support Special Issue on the PIEs guidance

  •  Editorial: Robin Johnson
  • It's not just homelessness services (that need to be psychologically informed): Keith & Ian Walton
  •  Meeting the needs of detached young runaways through PIEs: Emilie Smeaton
  • Learning from a Housing Association pilot:Aileen Edwards
  • Second Step's Wellbeing service in Bristol: Pennie Blackburn
  • A response from the sector: Vic Rayner
  • The (dis)tressing effects of working in (dis)stressed organisations: Chris Scanlon & John Adlam
  • PIEs. SPIEs and Homo SAPIENS: the view from social psychiatry: Tom Harrison
  • A counsellor's response: Jon Conolly
  • A response from the advocacy perspective: Annie Whelan

 Keyword searching in the Library will mean that you can identify all these papers using the string : 'HCS special issue'

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Finally, or the interface between PIEs and "Housing First" approaches, or between PIEs and 'Trauma Informed Care', see the separate sub-sections in this 'Resources, tools and ideas' section.

Finally, or the interface between PIEs and "Housing First" approaches, or between PIEs and 'Trauma Informed Care', see the separate sub-sections in this  section.